Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Questions:

What is an SOW?
How and When will I be billed?
What forms of payment do you accept?
What is an alteration or modification?
What is a Repair?
How do I know if I need a Repair?
What is a DER?
Why do I need DER involvement for my repair/alteration?
What is an 8110-3?
What is a Field Approval?
How do I get a Field Approval?
What is an STC?
How do I get an STC?
Do you have STCs for sale?
What will I receive from you?
Will I receive a copy of the structural substantiation report?
What is Damage Tolerance?
How do I know if I need a Damage Tolerance Analysis?
How long does it take to get DTA?
How long to do I have before I have to get DTA done?
What will I receive when DTA is accomplished?
Will I receive all pages of the entire Damage Tolerance Analysis report?
What is FAR 26?
Who is affected by FAR 26?
I have modified, or plan on modifying, my aircraft using one of your STCs. Will I be affected by FAR 26?

What is an SOW?
An SOW, or Statement of Work, is a document that Cotney Aerospace generates that defines the parameters of an agreement between Cotney Aerospace and our customers for a given project. The SOW usually provides a brief description describing the services that we will be responsible for as well as a cost estimate for services to be rendered. Once signed and returned, we consider that you have accepted our cost estimate and terms for the project. Some SOWs may have more specific information such as a detailed list of deliverables, schedule, or a list of needed data and information.

How and When will I be billed?
You will receive an invoice to the terms agreed on the Statement of Work (SOW)

What forms of payment do you accept?
We accept payment by: Check, Visa, Mastercard, American Express, and Electronic Funds Transfer. Please contact Mark Johnston for billing questions and payment arrangements. Please note that the method of payment will be check unless agreed upon at the initiation of the program.

What is an alteration or modification?
Per FAA Order 8110.37, an alteration is a modification to any type certificated product from one sound state to another sound state. The product must meet the original airworthiness specifications and standards both before and after the modification. Approval must consider the effect on airworthiness limitations and flight manuals. Modifications to aircraft structure may include anything as small as an antenna installation to a complete interior/VIP reconfiguration.

What is a Repair?
By Definition, per FAA Order 8110-37, a repair is restoration of a damaged or worn structure that is equal to its original or properly altered condition. This includes aerodynamic function, structural strength, deterioration, resistance to vibration, and any other qualities affecting airworthiness.

How do I know if I need a Repair?
Any damage to the aircraft primary and sometimes secondary structure that does not fall within the allowable damage of the aircraft structural repair manual (SRM) or maintenance manual (MM) should be repaired using FAA approved documentation. Some examples of damage include: corrosion, cracks, dents, gouges, punctures through the aircraft structure, delamination of honeycomb panels, etc. We are capable of providing engineering repair documentation and certification for most areas of the airframe and interiors. These may include: skins, frames or ribs, stringers, wings, flight control services, etc.

Some repairs may require Damage Tolerance Analysis and Approvals. See our FAQs about DTA for further information.

What is a DER?
A DER, or Designated Engineering Representative, is a person appointed by the FAA to approve repair/alteration data, This data is considered FAA approved when it is submitted on FAA Form 8110-3.

Why do I need DER involvement for my repair/alteration?
For a Field Approval, a DER's 8110-3 provides FAA approval for major repairs and alterations. For an STC, a DER can review data and write 8110-3s approving, or recommending approval, to the project ACO. Also a DER's knowledge, experience, and abilities can be an invaluable resource during the certification process.

What is an 8110-3?
An 8110-3 is a form, signed by a DER, for approving technical data found to be in compliance to FAA 14 CFR (FAR) regulations. It is typically aircraft specific and lists the numbers and titles of all drawings, reports, documents, and any other approvable data pertaining to a major repair or alteration. It also lists all applicable FAR regulations with which the data complies to.

What is a Field Approval?
A field approval is one of two ways by which technical data, used to accomplish a major repair or major alteration, is FAA approved. A Field approval is granted by an authorized FAA inspector. It approves all or part of the technical data submitted on an FAA Form 337, such as the engineering repair/alteration data and DER's 8110-3.

How do I get a Field Approval?
Guidelines and details on the field approval process can be found at www.faa.gov, or by contacting your local FSDO.

What is an STC?
A Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) is one of two ways by which technical data, used to accomplish a major repair or alteration, is FAA approved. A STC is a Type Certificate (TC) issued when an applicant has received FAA approval to modify an aircraft from its original design. An STC is issued by the FAA ACO (Aircraft Certification Office). The STC, which incorporates by reference the related TC, approves not only the modification but also how that modification affects the original design. FAA Order 8300.10 "Airworthiness Inspector's Handbook" lists the alterations exceeding field approval.

How do I get an STC?
The STC process can vary depending on the scope of the project. It is recommended that you contact us so that we may better answer your question.

Do you have STCs for purchase?
Yes. A list of available STCs can be found here.

What will I receive from you?
In most cases, you will receive a copy of all engineering documents/drawings pertinent to the repair(s) or alteration(s). Also, you will receive a copy of the signed FAA Form 8110-3 by the appointing DER(s).

Will I receive a copy of the structural substantiation report?
Generally, no. The substantiation report is considered proprietary data. It contains no installation instructions or details for the installer. It is kept on file at our office.

What is Damage Tolerance Analysis or DTA?
Damage Tolerance Analysis refers to a specific type of analysis performed on some repairs and modifications. The purpose of DTA is to calculate the expected time or cycles that it takes for a crack to be found and/or detected. From the damage tolerance analysis, the recommended times/cycles are calculated and posted on the inspection pages within the damage tolerance report. These times/cycles should be incorporated into the aircraft maintenance planning document or schedule.

How do I know if I need a Damage Tolerance Analysis?
We determine whether Damage Tolerance is needed by examining the TCDS (Type Certificate Data Sheet). From the TCDS, we examine the certification basis of the aircraft and any other applicable notes that may be included in the TCDS to determine whether an aircraft will require DTA. However; if you contact our office, any of our associates should be able to help you determine whether you will need to have DTA accomplished or not.

How long does it take to get DTA?
There are several factors that contribute to the time it takes to receive DTA. Generally, the DTA for most small antenna penetrations and fuselage skin repairs can take between 2 to 4 weeks. However; schedule and work load can factor heavily into the time it takes to have DTA accomplished. It is recommended to you contact us as early as possible to avoid scheduling conflicts.

How long to do I have before I have to get DTA done?
Per AC 25.1529-1, a damage tolerance evaluation and inspection program (including inspection procedures, thresholds, and intervals) are to be completed for applicable repairs within twelve months from the date of the 8110-3. However; it is recommended that you contact your local FSDO before-hand to see what they consider an acceptable time-frame to get DTA.

What will I receive when DTA is accomplished?
You will receive an excerpt(s) from the Damage Tolerance Analysis report providing the areas for repetative inspection. Also, you will receive a copy of the signed FAA Form 8110-3 by the appointing DT DER(s).

Will I receive all pages of the entire Damage Tolerance Analysis report?
No. The Damage Tolernace Analysis report is considered proprietary data. Generally, DTA is accomplished by one of our outside vendors. Only the inspection pages and 8110-3 are released to us to pass on to our customers.

What is FAR 26?
FAR 26 is a group of regulations established for continued airworthiness and safety improvements for transport category aircraft.

Who is affected by FAR 26?
Holders of and applicants of type certificates (TCs) and supplemental type certificates (STCs), over certain payload and passenger capacity. See www.faa.gov for additional information.

I have modified, or plan on modifying, my aircraft using one of your STCs. Will I be affected by FAR 26?
Very possibly. You will need to contact our office to determine if you will be impacted by FAR 26.